From the archives of some theosophical e-mail lists.

English

Universal Seekers

Subject: Ponderings On Living life

> Some things that I have learned.

> I've learned that no matter what happens, how bad it seems today, life does go on, and more often than not it will be a much better day tomorrow.

> I've learned that you can tell a lot about a person by the way he or she handles three things: a rainy day, lost luggage, and tangled Christmas tree lights.

> I've learned that, regardless of your relationship with your parents, you'll miss them when they're gone from your life.

> I've learned that "making a living" is not the same thing as "making a life."

> I've learned that life sometimes gives you a second chance.

> I've learned that you shouldn't go through life with a catcher's mitt on both hands. You need to be able to throw something back.

> I've learned that if you pursue happiness, it will elude you. But, if you focus on your family, your friends, the needs of others, your work and doing the very best you can, happiness will find you.

> I've learned that whenever I decide something with a caring and open heart, I usually make the right decision.

> I've learned that even when I have pains, I don't have to be one.

> I've learned that every day, you should reach out and touch someone. People love that human touch -- holding hands, a warm hug, or just a friendly pat on the back.

> I've learned that I still have a lot to learn. And don't ever forget about the importance of "attitude" and "motives" in your pursuits.

> I've learned that you should pass this on to someone you care about.

> I just did.

Date: Sat, 03 Feb 2001
From: Paul Johnson
Subject: Re: Ponderings On Living life

--- In UniversalSeekers@y..., "Jim Rodak" wrote:

> > > I've learned that you can tell a lot about a person by
> > the way he or she handles three things: a rainy day, lost
> > luggage, and tangled Christmas tree lights.

Or a people? Not long ago I read Larry McMurtry's travel book, entitled simply Roads IIRC, and he made an observation that was intriguing, horrifying, and sobering all at the same time. This book was only about travels in the US, but he described being stuck in a snowed-in airport somewhere in America in the 90s, and compared it to his recent experience of being among Bosnian (Kosovar? not sure which) refugees. He remarked that the air of total desperation, misery, agony, resentment etc. among Americans delayed a few hours by weather was far greater than that of former-Yugoslavians who had lost everything including, in many cases, loved ones, and were headed to an unknown destination. Helps put things into context.